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This Week at NASA | State of NASA, Gravitational Waves, more

Uploaded 02/12/2016

State of NASA, Gravitational Waves, more

During his Feb. 9 State of NASA speech at Langley Research Center in Hampton, Va, Administrator Charles Bolden characterized President Obama’s $19 billion Fiscal Year 2017 budget proposal for NASA as a vote of confidence and an indication of the agency’s strength. Bolden noted that the investments in the FY2017 budget proposal will empower NASA to continue to work with partners both in and out of government to develop the technologies that drive exploration – to build an even stronger future in which NASA continues reaching for new heights for the benefit of all humankind. Also, Space station one-year crew update, Increased land water slows sea level rise, Gravitational waves detected, and more.

 

TRANSCRIPT

 

Our NASA is strong

Charles Bolden, NASA Administrator:
“The state of our NASA is as strong as it’s ever been.” 

During his Feb. 9 State of NASA speech at Langley Research Center in Hampton, Va, Administrator Charlie Bolden characterized President Obama’s $19 billion Fiscal Year 2017 budget proposal for NASA as a vote of confidence and an indication of the agency’s strength … also saying that NASA’s strength is in its people.

Charles Bolden, NASA Administrator:
“It’s because of your work here at Langley … it’s because of the work of your colleagues at our NASA Centers around the country … the work of our contractors and our partners in classrooms, boardrooms, laboratories and even garages across our country.” 

Work that, the Administrator noted, is yielding results. From cleaner, safer and quieter air travel … to knowledge about other worlds in our solar system and beyond … from development of game-changing technologies, vehicles and systems needed to send humans to an asteroid and eventually to Mars in the 2030s … to using the vantage point of space to improve life on Earth, as well as the health of the planet itself.

Charles Bolden, NASA Administrator:
“The investments in the President’s FY2017 budget proposal announced today will empower the people of NASA to … continue to work with partners both in and out of government to develop the technologies that drive exploration.  … working on what William Shakespeare would call, ‘such stuff as dreams are made of.’” 

Working toward, what the Administrator says he hopes will be an even stronger future in which NASA continues reaching for new heights for the benefit of all humankind.

Space station one-year crew update

Aboard the International Space Station, one-year crew members Scott Kelly of NASA and Russia’s Mikhail Kornienko remain busy – participating in immunology, vision and heart experiments as part of research to learn how to keep humans healthy on long duration spaceflights. Kelly and British astronaut Tim Peake also worked on replacement of a fan pump separator in a U.S. spacesuit. Kelly and Kornienko are scheduled to return to Earth  March 1.

Increased land water slows sea level rise 

New measurements from NASA’s GRACE satellite have allowed researchers to identify and quantify, for the first time, how climate-driven increases of liquid water storage on land have affected the rate of sea level rise. A new study by scientists at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, published in the journal Science Feb. 12, shows that while ice sheets and glaciers continue to melt, changes in weather and climate over the past decade have caused Earth’s continents to soak up and store an extra 3.2 trillion tons of water in soils, lakes and underground aquifers. The scientists say that is temporarily slowing the rate of sea level rise by about 20 percent. Globally, the water gains over land equal the volume of Lake Huron, the world’s seventh largest lake.

Gravitational waves detected

On Feb. 11, the National Science Foundation (NSF) announced that gravitational waves were detected by the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO), a pair of ground-based observatories in Washington State and Louisiana. One hundred years ago, Albert Einstein predicted these waves as being ripples in the fabric of space-time, caused by massive, accelerating bodies, such as black holes orbiting each other. This discovery could lead to a whole new branch of astrophysics and a new way of understanding our universe. NASA is working closely with the European Space Agency (ESA) to develop a concept for a space-based gravitational wave observatory.

The Journey to Mars 101

A Feb. 11 Journey to Mars 101 event at the Fox Studios’ Zanuck Theatre in Los Angeles featured astronaut Kjell Lindgren, several others from NASA, and makers of the movie “The Martian”, discussing developments in technology that might help make future human travel to Mars a reality. Many of the technologies seen in the movie are similar to technologies NASA is currently developing for its Journey to Mars.

And that’s what’s up this week @NASA.

 

 

(c)2016 NASA | SCVTV
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